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Collapsed Trachea Super Support

Holistic support for tracheal collapse in dogs and cats

Resp-Aid, Lesstress, Turmeric & Petomega 3

USD $163.80
Collapsed Trachea Super Support USD $163.80 Add to Cart

Vet Tech Rounds: Collapsed Trachea in Pets

Vet Talks 3 min read
Vet Tech Rounds: Collapsed Trachea in Pets

When you start noticing your pet is coughing more than usual, it might be a sign that something is not right with them. But when it comes to coughing, there are several health conditions out there that your furkid can have. One that many pet parents don’t always think of is a collapsed trachea.

What Is Collapsed Trachea?

Collapsed trachea is a disease that seems to be even more prevalent in smaller breed dogs. It is a chronic and progressive disease of the trachea and unfortunately, it is an irreversible condition. The main breeds that suffer from a collapsed trachea are Yorkshire terriers, Pomeranians, Poodles, Shih Tzu’s, and Lhasa Apsos. It can affect all ages and sexes but seems to be diagnosed a lot more in middle-aged to senior dogs (4-14 years). Dogs that are more at risk are those that are overweight or pets that live in a household with smokers.

The trachea is also known as the windpipe and is the pathway that air takes to be transported to the lungs from the nose or mouth. A healthy trachea is made up of a flexible tube that contains rings of cartilage that help to keep the airway open while breathing. A collapsed trachea means that these rings of cartilage begin to get flatter and weaker until the trachea eventually collapses.

The collapsed trachea can reach all the way down to the bronchi (these are the tubes inside the lungs that supply air to tiny air sacs that exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide). When the collapse reaches this far, it can cause the airway to be severely compromised.

Symptoms

Some of the symptoms presented with a collapsed trachea include:

  • Harsh and dry cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Exercise intolerance
  • A blue tinge on the gums
  • Fainting
  • Wheezy/abnormal breathing
  • Retching
  • Rapid breathing

Diagnosis

To diagnose a collapsed trachea in pets, a veterinarian will take a chest x-ray. It can also help determine the size of the heart as a tracheal collapse may not always be visible on regular x-rays.

If there is nothing obvious on the x-ray, fluoroscopy can be done. Fluoroscopy is basically a moving x-ray that will allow the vet to check the condition of the trachea while the dog is breathing. It helps them identify any problems as the size of the trachea can change when they are breathing in and out.

An endoscopy is a camera that can view the inside of the trachea, which can provide your veterinarian with very clear images of what is going on inside. And last but not least, an echocardiogram is done, which is an ultrasound of the heart. This is done to evaluate cardiac function, which can often be affected when a pet is dealing with a collapsed trachea.

diagram of a collapsed trachea in a dog

Treatment

Sadly, there is no cure for a collapsed trachea, but there are different ways in which pet parents can help keep their little ones comfortable.

Sadly, there is no cure for a collapsed trachea, but there are different ways in which pet parents can help keep their little ones comfortable. If your pooch is overweight, it is vital that the diet is adjusted in order for them to reach their ideal weight. Some dogs may need heavier doses of sedation to stop the coughing because the constant coughing will irritate the airway, causing them to cough even more. It is best to try to keep them away from any smoke and other environmental pollution that can irritate the airways.

Many pets suffering from this condition will require medication for the rest of their lives while others may require surgical intervention, depending on the severity. The surgery involves placing plastic rings around the outside of the trachea or sometimes a stent is put inside the trachea to hold the airway open.

Natural Support

To help ease some of the symptoms of a collapsed trachea, our pet experts advise using:

NHV Resp-Aid is a blend of 9 herbs that support respiratory function, help to lubricate the mucous membranes in the respiratory system, and help to reduce coughing. It can support the lungs by naturally easing pressure and inflammation.

NHV Turmeric can help to reduce inflammation and discomfort while improving liver and heart function.

NHV PetOmega 3 is packed with essential omega 3 fatty acids that can help to encourage immune system function, promote healthy skin and coat, and supports important organs like the kidneys, heart, and eyes.

NHV Lesstress can help to prevent anxiety, stress, and excitability as they can lead to coughing attacks.

Does your dog suffer from a collapsed trachea? Send us a message and our pet experts will be happy to help find the best supplements for your furkid!

Holly RVN

Holly RVN

Holly graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Nursing from the Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland. She also completed a 1-year Animal Care course. Worked in small Animal Veterinary practice for 3+ years before moving on to working in the Equine Industry. Holly is passionate about animals and spends much of her spare time going on long walks with her Boston Terrier, Lloyd.

Published: March 20, 2020

4 replies

  1. Hi, my Yorkie was put on Hydrocodone Homatopine very young and is still on it. She is now 6. She will still occasionally still cough. X-rays have been taken but never proven that she has a collapsed trachea. We can’t effort to have the tube down her nose. They said it would cost 4,000.00.

    1. Raphael M says:

      Hi Margaret,

      We’re so sorry to hear about your furkid. We know how hard this can be, especially when you are not sure what you’re facing.

      There are a few supplements that may support her during this difficult moment. As it is an anatomical health condition, the supplements will only support the condition. For example, NHV Resp-Aid may help her breathe better and NHV Turmeric may help decrease the inflammation. Unfortunately, it will not solve the problem, but may help her through it. And the use of a body harness instead of a neck collar can help as well.

      Please let us know if there’s anything we can do to help. We’re here for you!

      Yours in wellness,
      NHV Team

  2. Cathy Peterson says:

    Hi there, our cockapoo was diagnosed with a collapsed lung about 4-5 years ago. she’s on 4 different pharmaceuticals to help with heart function, pulmonary high blood pressure caused by the collapsed lung etc. We have her on low sodium food to keep any fluid retention low and watch her weight although she is VERY food motivated. Recently she started the honking cough, wheezing on exhalation and hacking. We haven’t done the flouroscopy but i’m concerned it may also be a collapsing trachea. Would the supplements above be a good idea and helpful do you think? She still full of energy and went on a 2 1/2 mi. walk yesterday…

    1. Team NHV says:

      Hi Cathy,

      We’re really sorry to hear about her collapsed lung and heart health. We can only imagine how uncomfortable it must be for her.

      We may have a regimen that can help to support her against the symptoms.

      1. Resp-Aid is our main respiratory supplement that can help to support your little one’s lungs and ease the congestion in the chest and nose.

      2. Yucca is a super herb that can help the body produce natural corticosteroids. The herbal properties can help to support her body against pain and inflammation naturally.

      3. We have Hearty Heart as our main heart health support, it can help to balance blood pressure, heart palpitations and improve the blood flow. It also has antispasmodic properties to help relax the heart muscle naturally and gently.

      4.Milk Thistle can help to detoxify the toxin traces, sometimes vet meds and chemical laden foods can leave, from the liver naturally and gently.

      All our supplements are vet-formulated and safe for dogs, cats and birds. We advertise them differently for SEO purposes, so please don’t mind the names of the links we’ve shared. The recommended dosage however is based on the weight of your little one.

      Do take your time to go through the recommended regimen and feel free to share it with your vet team. We’re always just a message away if you need anything or have any questions, our pet experts are always happy to help you support your cockapoo! Sending your sweet girl lots of love and healing vibes.

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