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Evaluating NHV Tripsy for Management of Lower Urinary Tract Disease in Healthy Cats

Clinical Trials & Research 3 min read
study by dr. Joe bartges on NHV tripsy

Encouraging results from the evaluation of our NHV herbal compounds continue to come. NHV Tripsy was studied by The University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine under the supervision of Dr. Joe Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN, Professor of Medicine and Nutrition, Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Veterinary Medical Center UGA VCM. The results of the study on cats were shared in their end of year research report that is read by  members of the university, legislators, veterinarians, and donors.

Evaluation of an Herbal Compound Used for Management of Lower Urinary Tract Disease in Healthy Cats

Lower urinary tract disease occurs commonly in cats, and urolithiasis accounts for 15 to 30% of these cases. Importantly, 80 to 90% of feline uroliths are composed of calcium oxalate or struvite. In young adult cats, struvite occurs more commonly while in older adult cats calcium oxalate occurs more commonly.

Cats with urolithiasis are managed by increasing water intake and urine volume to reduce urinary concentrations of calculogenic minerals and potential initiators of urinary bladder pain and inflammation. These larger urine volumes also increase urine transit time and voiding frequency, which reduce retention time for crystal formulation and growth or the diffusion of noxious substances across the bladder uroepithelium. Feeding cats a canned food is the most practical means of increasing water intake and lowering calcium oxalate urine saturation and concentration of potential initiators of bladder pain. The goal is to dilute urine to a specific gravity of < 1.0303.

In addition to conventional therapy using modified diets, traditional Chinese and Western herbs have been recommended. Although Chorieto decreased the risk of struvite formation in young adult cats, no benefit was found in another study or three commonly used herbal treatments San Ren Tang, Wei Ling Tang, and Alism. The purpose of his study was to evaluate the efficacy of an herbal supplement containing extracts from multiple plants. We hypothesized that the supplement would be associated with increased urine volume and decreased urine saturation for calcium oxalate and struvite when compared with placebo.

A pilot study was performed to evaluate the supplement on risk of struvite and calcium oxalate crystal formation in healthy cats. Seven healthy, male cats, aded between 8 months and 5 years, were evaluated using a randomized placebo cross-over study in a pairwise fashion, each cat receiving treatment every we hours for a two-week periods. Samples were analyzed for electrolytes, minerals, and other compounds, and relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate and struvite was estimated using an iterative computer program. Data were assessed for normal distribution and statistical significance.

Data from 6cats were used due to incomplete urine collection from 1 cat. Urine saturation for struvite was significantly lower when cats received supplement compared with placebo (supplement = 0.36 +- 0.19, placebo = 1.57 +_ 1.28; p = 0.04) and 24-hour urinary excretion of phosphorous was lower when cats received supplement compared with placebo (supplement = 44.9, range = 24.4-61.3 mg/kg/24h; placebo = 50.8, 41.4-63.5 mg/kg/24h; p = 0.04) There were no differences in other analyses, body weight, or urine volume.

The significant decrease in struvite supersaturation even with the small number of healthy cats suggested that determination of relative supersaturation is a better determinant of risk of urolith formation than electrolyte and mineral concentrations or their excretion. The herbal supplement may be beneficial for managing struvite-associated lower urinary disease in acts.

Funding Agency – New Faculty Startup, NHV Pet Products, Inc.

Principal Investigator – Dr. Joe Bartges

Co-investigators – Mr. Cook English, Ms. Ashley Shaw, Dr. Sherry Cox

UGA VCM NHV tripsy research report

Find more information about the study conducted here.

Here are the presentations made by the Co-investigators Ms. Ashley Shaw and Mr. Cook English as made at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, ACVIM Forum 2018.

Vet student Ashley conducted a double-blinded, randomized placebo cross-over study on 14 healthy client-owned dogs. The Relative Super Saturation (RSS) for Calcium Oxalate crystals was significantly lower for the supplement when compared with the placebo.

Study conducted by UGA VCM finds NHV Tripsy beneficial for cats and dogs

Vet student Cook conducted a double-blinded, randomized placebo cross-over study on 7 young, healthy cats. The Relative Super Saturation (RSS) for Struvite crystals was significantly lower for the supplement when compared with the placebo.

Study conducted by UGA VCM finds NHV Tripsy beneficial for cats and dogs


We are grateful to Dr. Bartges and The University of Georgia for studying the effects of our herbal supplement NHV Tripsy and its effectiveness in managing urinary ailments commonly found in cats and dogs. In an effort to reward the trust pet parents and veterinarians place in us, we shall continue to take steps towards researching our herbal dietary supplements and their benefits.

Published: March 25, 2019

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